REVIEW: Alex Dripchak — 100 Skills of the Successful Sales Professional (BOOK)

The title of 100 Skills of the Successful Sales Professional: Your Guidebook to Establishing & Elevating your Career reads akin to the thesis statement of a paper. It basically encapsulates everything either covered with the entirety of the book’s pages, or the specificity of the corporate philosophy everything highlighted promotes. The author of the book, twenty-nine year-old sales expert, senior company advisor, and entrepreneur Alex Dripchak, knows the profile of who he chooses to speak to.

COMMENCE YOUR CAREER: https://www.commenceyourcareer.com/

While universal in its appeal literarily-speaking, the book has a particular tonal deference that young professionals fresh out of college may find the most appealing. It’s rare to find someone who retains a distinctive authenticity after having risen significantly through the ranks, as often a certain, glamorized fakery has been the traditionalist’s view of navigating the corporate jungle. But tactics employing certain sets of artificiality are starting to be out of fashion, and true to the current sociopolitical forum it’s impacting the way seasoned professionals in varying milieus sell themselves to the public. Appearing authentic has appeared to be one of the runners-up to the societal nexus everyone appears to be hungering for. Competence, knowledge, and even to a certain degree distinctive examples are second to one’s communicative abilities, the latter a major theme reinforced throughout 100 Skills of the Successful Sales Professional’s pages from beginning to end.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: https://www.100salesskills.com/

What stood out to me particularly within Dripchak’s read was his particular focus on the behavioral psychologies mandated for the best professional communicative ability. Everything from solicitation to maintaining one’s interpersonal, pragmatic relationships mandates a certain degree of emotional intelligence — the idea of such a concept being synonymous with corporate success arguably eschewed twenty years prior down the road. It shows up in interesting, observational passages complimenting the general idea of the book, in particular examples like the following. “When you think about the working world, you ever realize how much time you spend repeating yourself? Any client service issue requires escalation up the chain and restating your case often.

Any meeting inevitably has a project leader repeating themselves at the beginning. Sometimes, this is the nature of the beast, but most of the time, it’s because someone failed to listen earlier on and/or failed to inform the rest of the team/ meeting constituents of what was discussed,” Dripchak writes. “It’s disheartening to have to repeat yourself in each meeting and even more so when you have to do it in the meeting! Why does this happen so often? Well, for starters, it’s because, typically, most people aren’t listening. Instead, they are waiting to speak. They stopped talking so that you can say something before they say the next thing on their mind; they were extending this tiny courtesy to you — some don’t even do that! They just babble on without letting you get a word in.”

AMAZON: https://www.amazon.com/100-Skills-Successful-Sales-Professional/dp/1637420625

It’s these kind of observational tendencies that rise 100 Skills above the typical dryness of the leadership advice nonfiction sub-genre. It also genuinely humanizes and enlightens the reader about various items critical to the relationship-building process, often are lost within the denseness of the text.

Colin Jordan

Graduate: McNeese State University, Avid Beekeeper, Deep Sea Diver & Fisherman, Horrible Golfer